Watch the Evolution of the iPhone in a Single GIF

Watch the Evolution of the iPhone in a Single GIF

The iPhone’s design is famous for meticulous attention to detail, and over the years, there have been some pretty major tweaks. A new GIF from GadgetLove captures how the phone’s hardware has changed over the years.

Whenever a new iPhone comes out, we compare it to its predecessors. Is the bezel slimmer? The coloring sleeker? Is it worth buying a new one? (If you’re an iPhone devotee, the answer is usually hell yes. If you’re an Android fanboy, the answer is usually spitting on the ground in disgust.)

Spec comparison charts are definitely more handy if you’re trying to decide which generation to buy, but this GIF is hypnotizing and pretty and I kind of want to make it my screensaver. [GadgetLove]

http://ift.tt/1wxuIzu

Source: Gizmodo http://ift.tt/1wONmWr

What does the rise of brand journalism mean? For one thing, it means journalists have to up their game

What happens when brands become media entities in their own right, with all the same tools for reaching readers or viewers? Journalists and traditional media outlets have to try harder to provide something valuable, or their audience will go elsewhere

What does the rise of brand journalism mean? For one thing, it means journalists have to up their game originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2014.

Continue reading…

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

Source: Gigaom http://ift.tt/1wOMT6R

US courts agree to restore 10 years of deleted online public records

The restoration comes after pressure from lawmakers infuriated over the purging. http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

Source: Ars Technica http://ift.tt/1r7lU2E

Accessibility features on the LG G3

LG’s additions to Android’s accessibility settings are notable and helpful

Modern smartphones, like the LG G3, are built for everyone in mind. That means folks who get up every morning, strap on their FitBit and go for a run, as well as those who just need a bit of help holding something small and slippery like a smartphone in their hands. We’re not all built the same or can perform the same functions, and a good smart device knows this and allows for some fine-tuning to suit almost everyone. The G3 does an excellent job at this!

There are plenty of accessibility features built right into Android itself, but like most other things, the people who makes the phones we buy and love can (and have) added plenty of their own touches in this critical area. You should have a look here and see the basic Accessibility settings available from Android, then read down and see how LG has added to this list and made it better.



http://ift.tt/1r8bgYe

Source: Android Central – Android Forums – News – Reviews – Help and Android Wallpapers http://ift.tt/1wOLH3o

A 3D printer will make its way to the International Space Station tonight

A 3D printer could save astronauts in an emergency by providing access to a specialized tool they never thought they would need. Made in Space will use what it learns from this printer to develop a second version set to launch next year.

A 3D printer will make its way to the International Space Station tonight originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2014.

Continue reading…

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

Source: Gigaom http://ift.tt/1ukACST

Where to Watch College Football Games If You Don’t Have Cable

Where to Watch College Football Games If You Don't Have Cable

The college football season has kicked off, but finding the game you want isn’t always easy when you don’t have cable. Here’s a few places you can check out to try and catch your favorite teams.

Over at weblog Living on the Cheap Jeff Mac rounded up the best places to go for the big games. Most of these are online so it should be easy for you to find what you’re after:

  • ABC Online: For the lucky folks who in Southern California, Chicago, Houston, New York City, or Philadelphia, the network is live-streaming their channel on web browers, Android devices, and iPad. It checks for your location every time you hop on, but a proxy might help you out here.
  • ESPN3: If you have high-speed internet, most providers will let you log on and watch the 44% of college football games aired on this channel without a cable sub.
  • Check Your Cellphone Provider: Some providers offer packages that allow the streaming of some ESPN games. You’d have to watch these games on your phone or push them to your TV.
  • Conference Specific Apps: If you want to keep up with specific conferences, ACC, Big10, PAC12, and SEC conferences all have their own app. These require subscriptions starting at around eight bucks and only feature games not televised on other channels. CBS Sports Line also has a subscription plan that aggregates most of the conferences in one service.

If you still can’t find what you’re look for, don’t forget that you can always look for radio broadcasts online and at least listen to the game. If you’re willing to make the bump up to basic cable—or have a friend with a cable package whose log-in info you can borrow—WatchESPN.com and its app for Android and iOS give you access almost anywhere. For more information on how to watch the game without springing for cable, check out the link below.

6 ways to watch college football without cable | Living on the Cheap

http://ift.tt/1u7JEpR

Source: Lifehacker http://ift.tt/1ukAenx

Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don’t adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

http://ift.tt/1sF8FDl



http://ift.tt/eekxlt

Source: Slashdot http://ift.tt/1mmVRVo

Through the Google lens: search trends Sept 12-18

http://ift.tt/1wxsDDD

Source: The Official Google Blog http://ift.tt/1tzUy6s

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America’s First Cancer Hospital

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

On the southwest corner of Central Park West and 106th Street in New York City, there’s an enormous castle. It takes up the whole east end of the block, with its red brick cylindrical turrets topped with gleaming silver cones. The stained glass windows and intricate stonework make the building look like something out of a fairytale.

http://ift.tt/1sF6cc3

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Credit: Stern.

This building’s past, however, is not very fairytale-like at all.

When it was built in 1887, this castle was the country’s first hospital devoted solely to the treatment of cancer. In the late 1800s, cancer was known to start as a tumor, but doctors didn’t know a whole lot beyond that.

In the back of the castle, was crematorium and a smokestack which was smoking pretty often.

In the late 1800s, a lot of hospitals in the United States didn’t want to treat cancer patients because they thought cancer was contagious. Hospitals also had to publish their "death rates," so they’d turn away patients who were likely to skew the numbers. This gave rise to tuberculosis hospitals and other specialty hospitals for diseases that were particularly deadly.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Courtesy of New York Public Library.

During and after the Civil War, American cancer patients would go to Europe, if they could afford it, since European doctors had developed more advanced forms of cancer treatment. Doctors from the United States would also go to Europe to study pathology and surgical techniques, and one such doctor, J. Marion Sims, wanted to bring some of these European cancer removal methods back to the United States.

Sims had previously worked at the New York Women’s Hospital, but in 1874 that hospital decided not to admit patients with cancer, because, for all they knew, cancer was fatally contagious. In 1887 Sims and a number of philanthropists established the first hospital exclusively devoted to cancer care: the castle at 455 Central Park West.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

The rooms were round with large ventilation shafts in the middle. Courtesy of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center archives.

The building’s fairytale appearance, it turns out, wasn’t unusual for hospitals of the time. These facilities were built like aristocratic mansions, with high walls, gatehouses, elaborate entries, and sometimes turrets, as a way of enticing wealthy patients.

In the late 1800s, hospitals were charitable institutions run by philanthropists, where poor people went for care. The wealthy mostly received care at home. Architect Charles Haight hoped the luxurious design of the New York Cancer Hospital would be a lure for paying customers.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Courtesy of New York Public Library.

The big, round turrets that make the building look like a castle were actually wards that housed patients. The perfectly circular rooms were about 40 feet in diameter, and from an aerial view, the rooms looked like the face of clock, with beds around the perimeter. Doctors could easily make the rounds from bed to bed, and these circular rooms kept dirt from accumulating in corners.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Courtesy of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center archives.

Patients got plenty of fresh air, sunlight, and delicious food. There were even champagne parties and carriage rides in Central Park to further entice paying customers. The building tried to make patients feel like they were going off the French country side, instead of a scary place where they would be subject to experimental cancer treatments and, quite possibly, die.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Courtesy of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center archives.

Medically, nobody really had any idea what they were doing. The main treatment for cancer at the time was surgery—namely, cutting people open and removing every lymph node possible while still keeping the patient alive.

This was also before the time of antibiotics, so a lot of patients died from infections
after surgery. As late as 1920, only around 15% of patients survived a cancer diagnosis for more than 2 years. In 1900, the numbers were even lower, (hence the on-site crematorium). Under that billowing smokestack, the New York Cancer Hospital soon earned a nickname: The Bastille. In trying to look like French chateau, the New York Cancer Hospital ended up feeling like a French prison. Despite a huge demand for cancer treatment, the hospital struggled financially and couldn’t attract patients.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer HospitalCourtesy of RKTB Architects, P.C.

In an attempt to get people in the door, the New York Cancer Hospital procured a controversial new form of medicine: radium. Radiation therapy, even more so than surgery, was completely unexplored, and a lot of doctors and care workers developed cancer themselves from handing the element.

It wasn’t until the 1930s or that surgery improved and chemotherapy and other organized radiation treatments made cancer care very lucrative. In 1939, the cancer hospital left 455 Central Park West for the Upper East Side, where it became Memorial Sloan Kettering, which is now known as one of the best hospitals for cancer treatment in the U.S.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Courtesy of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center archives.

Now, of course, hospitals don’t look like castles anymore. After World War I, hospitals start to look like small civic institutions like city halls, or schools, with square block-like units. Paying patients could expect single rooms, and non-paying patients could be put in a double or quadruple room. Instead of investing in gourmet food, champagne, and carriage rides, hospitals channeled money into surgical suites and mechanical equipment. Wooden beds and dressers disappeared and instead all furnishings were metal and carried an air of efficiency.

After World War II, office building became the models for skyscraper-like hospitals. After the 1980s, hospitals start to look like shopping malls, with just one or two floors of big open spaces.

Hospitals have done away with circular rooms, but the general idea of easy-to-clean rounded corners has actually persisted. If you go visit a hospital today, look at where the wall meets the floor. It’s probably curved, so that nothing can get stuck in the right angle between the wall and the floor.

455 Central Park West went through a really dark period in the mid-1950s, when it became a notoriously roach infested, abusive nursing home. Towers Nursing Home was shut down in the 1970s and the building sat vacant and in state of disrepair throughout the 1980s.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Credit: RKTB Architects, P.C.

Today, in 21st century Manhattan, even a haunted old hospital can become expensive housing. 455 Central Park West has been turned into 17 round, light-filled condo units, complete with a parking garage, a spa, a pool, and a fitness center. Finally, after a hundred years of imitating upscale real estate, the castle on the park finally is actually what its always wanted to be: a nice place for rich people.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Credit: RKTB Architects, P.C.

This Mysterious NYC Castle Was Actually America's First Cancer Hospital

Photo by John Bartelstone, courtesy of RKTB Architects, P.C.

Producer Jessica Miller and 99% Invisible’s Katie Mingle spoke with writer Jim Rasenberger; Elaine Schattner, clinical associate professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College; and AnnMarie Adams, director of the Architecture School at McGill University.


Music: "Hospital Food"- Eels (more coming soon)


Feature image by
Jim Henderson


99% Invisible, the greatest podcast of all time, is a tiny radio show about design, architecture & the 99% invisible activity that shapes our world. You can Like them on Facebook here or follow them on Twitter here. To subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, head over here.

This post has been republished with permission from Roman Mars. It was originally published on 99% Invisible’s blog, which accompanies each podcast.

http://ift.tt/1wOK8SS

Source: Gizmodo http://ift.tt/Xx2GHS

MIT can turn your smartphone into a different kind of second screen

MIT can turn your smartphone into a different kind of second screen

Sure, we’ve seen apps that let you easily share files between your phone and PC. No biggie there. But the demo we’re about to show you is a tad more sophisticated than that. Over at MIT, two teams of researchers have developed a smartphone system called THAW, which allows you to share files and use the phone as a game controller — all by pressing the handset against your computer’s display. As you can see in the below demo video, for instance, it’s possible to transfer files onto the phone simply by dragging them where the phone is, as if it were just another folder on your desktop. Similar to what you can already do with NFC, you can press the phone against the screen, and walk away with whatever web page you had been looking at. (To be fair, iOS 8’s Continuity feature does that automatically.)

Most interesting of all, perhaps, are the implications for gaming. Indeed, the researchers’ nearly four-minute video spends more time on desktop games than any other use case. For starters, the phone can act as a boundary for something in the game — the equivalent of a wall, or a rock, that a character has to jump over. Additionally, the handset can become a "container" (for lack of a better word), which you can use to carry a character or object out of the game, and then redeposit them somewhere else on the screen. Alternatively, by holding the phone over the display while a game is in progress, you can alter the behavior of a game — maybe that Guillotine of Doom moves a bit slower when the phone is there.

Throughout, the phone never obscures what’s on the screen; it actually reflects it, as if the entire phone were a see-through piece of glass. The trick: Your phone’s rear camera captures imagery on the computer, while additional software processing on the handset allows you to manipulate objects from your handheld device. As always with prototypes, there’s no guarantee if or when this will come to market. As MIT describes it, though, it seems this could work on any handset with a rear camera and possibly an accelerometer. In other words, any modern smartphone.

Filed under: , ,

Comments

Via: PhysOrg

Source: MIT

http://ift.tt/1tzPZcg

Source: Engadget Full RSS Feed http://ift.tt/1sF3nrc