The epic slow motion shots of Zack Snyder’s movies

The epic slow motion shots of Zack Snyder's movies

When I first saw 300, it felt like I was using my eyes for the very first time. The stunning visuals made it feel epic. And though I may not feel the same about other Zack Snyder movies, I still enjoy watching them because if you use enough slow motion like he does, you can trick me into thinking something is epic.

Jaume R. Lloret stitched together slow motion scenes from 300, Watchmen, Legend of the Guardians and Sucker Punch in this clip below.


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Deadspin A Gentleman’s Guide To Sex In Prison | Gawker 12 Jobs From My Recent Past | io9 10 Stupid A

Deadspin A Gentleman’s Guide To Sex In Prison | Gawker 12 Jobs From My Recent Past | io9 10 Stupid Arguments People Use To Defend Comic Book Sexism | Kotaku Ask Dr. Nerdlove: The Neediness Problem | Kinja Popular Posts

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Apple and Amazon Take Baby Steps Toward Digital Sharing

Sharing things in the digital world hasn’t caught up with the physical world because licensing and copyright issues are a lot trickier to navigate than handing someone a book. http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

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Android L’s newest security feature: out-of-the-box encryption

Apple isn’t the only one that’s making its software a lot more secure, and erm, fed-proof — Google’s upcoming Android platform will apparently be encrypted by default, according to The Washington Post. The publication didn’t clarify whether it’s Android’s full-disk encryption, which Google first rolled out in 2011, but it did say that nobody can access the encrypted device (not even the company), unless they know its four-digit pin. Does that mean users will be forced to nominate a passcode upon setup? We don’t know for sure, but with encryption in place, Mountain View (just like Apple) won’t be able to assist authorities in searching your phone, so long as you keep your passcode a secret.

Company spokeswoman Niki Christoff told the Post that keys/passcodes are not stored online or anywhere off your device, so Google has no way to share them. Also, with this update, you won’t even have to think or figure out how to switch encryption on, since you’re protected from the start. Google has apparently been developing this Android L feature for months, because while feds generally can’t search phones without a warrant, it wants its software to be more resistant to government snooping.

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Larry Ellison, who you’ll remember as the CEO of Oracle and a man who likes to build really, really

Larry Ellison, who you’ll remember as the CEO of Oracle and a man who likes to build really, really fast sailboats, has relinquished his boss-man role at Oracle. Although it means that Oracle won’t be helmed by Ellison for the first time ever, he insists that "nothing will change". [Reuters]

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3D Printing Is Being Used to Restore a Frank Lloyd Wright Classic

3D Printing Is Being Used to Restore a Frank Lloyd Wright Classic

The largest collection of Frank Lloyd Wright buildings in the world is at Florida Southern University. Depending on how you count, there are 7 to 12 buildings, the most distinctive of which is Annie Pfeiffer Chapel. Time has taken its toll on the chapel’s one-of-a-kind concrete blocks, but it’s the 21st century, and we now have a modern solution to fix them: 3D printing.

Child of the Sun, as the group of Wright-designed buildings is called, was built over two decades between 1941 and 1958. A few years ago, the architecture firm Mesick Cohen Wilson Baker Architects (MCWB) was brought on to restore the buildings.

3D Printing Is Being Used to Restore a Frank Lloyd Wright Classic

Annie Pfeiffer Chapel during the restoration. Credit: MCWB Architects

The Pfeiffer Chapel presented a special challenge. Thousands of Wright’s signature textile blocks make up the walls of the chapel. Time—as well as a hurricane and a failed restoration attempt—have not been kind to the crumbling concrete blocks. With the original handcrafted molds lost, reproducing the patterned blocks would have been prohibitively expensive.

Enter the 3D printing restoration project, funded by $50,000 from the Florida Division of Historical Resources and $350,000 from the National Park Service’s Save America’s Treasures Program. Rather than print concrete blocks, the architects printed plastic molds to cast the concrete. Some handmade parts were added to finalize the molds, but the machines significantly lightened the traditionally labor-intensive process.

3D Printing Is Being Used to Restore a Frank Lloyd Wright Classic



3D Printing Is Being Used to Restore a Frank Lloyd Wright Classic

Molds being 3D printed. Credit: Florida Southern College

The restoration at Pfeiffer Chapel is still in progress, and the architects are perfecting their mold printing process. Should it all work out, 3D printing could one day have a major role in the faithful restoration of buildings. To start, Wright designed several iconic textile houses, all made of concrete, all aging, all potential candidates someday for 3D printing restoration. [Metropolis, Florida Southern University]

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Klarna Announces U.S. Team As It Plans For 2015 Launch In The U.S.

klarna-ecommerce The payments market in the U.S. couldn’t be be more competitive, and now yet another player is entering the mix. Stockholm-based Klarna is set to announce its U.S. team ahead of expansion plans into North America, which will begin in earnest at the beginning of 2015. Klarna, a European giant, which has raised $282.1 million over six rounds of financing, according to CrunchBase, has set… Read More

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Rubbery, crawling robot can traverse snow, fire

Harvard’s Michael Tolley created the 65cm long, soft, pneumatic robot whose operating parameters allow it to run over -9’C terrain or walk through naked flames (for 20 seconds, at least).
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iFixit begins live teardown of iPhone 6 Plus, revealing 2915 mAh battery

In keeping with tradition, iFixit has started its live teardown of the latest iPhone hardware (an iPhone 6 Plus in this case), revealing all of the device’s internal components for the first time. So far we’ve already seen a 2915 mAh battery, which provides the increased battery life in the much larger of the two models. […] http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

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YouTube commissions original content from top creators as it tests new formats

YouTube has revealed a new plan to invest in original content from popular creators on its platform. In a blog post, the company outlined its existing investments in creators, such as channel partnerships, YouTube Space studios, and marketing campaigns. “Now, we feel the time is right to make another important investment in our creators,” Alex Carloss, Head of YouTube Originals, wrote. “That’s why we’ve decided to fund new content from some of our top creators, helping them not only fulfill their creative ambitions but also deliver new material to their millions of fans on YouTube.” Carloss acknowledged that experimenting with…

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